Biology, asked by mansimehta0902, 4 days ago

What is the reason for the rapid increase in the spirogyra population?

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Answered by renutanisha2006
0

Explanation:

Although Spirogyra Link (1820) is a common mat-forming filamentous alga in fresh waters, little is known of its ecology. A 2-year field study in Surrey Lake, Indiana, showed that it grew primarily in the spring of each year. The population consisted of four morphologically distinct filamentous forms, each exhibiting its own seasonal distribution. A 45-μm-wide filament was present from February to late April or early May, a 70-μm-wide form was present from late April to mid-June, a 100-μm-wide form was present from February to mid-June, and a 130-μm-wide form appeared only in February of 1 of 2 study years.

Answered by mittal2357parv
1

Answer:VAlthough Spirogyra Link (1820) is a common mat-forming filamentous alga in fresh waters, little is known of its ecology. A 2-year field study in Surrey Lake, Indiana, showed that it grew primarily in the spring of each year. The population consisted of four morphologically distinct filamentous forms, each exhibiting its own seasonal distribution. A 45-μm-wide filament was present from February to late April or early May, a 70-μm-wide form was present from late April to mid-June, a 100-μm-wide form was present from February to mid-June, and a 130-μm-wide form appeared only in February of 1 of 2 study years. The 70- and 100-μm-wide forms contributed to the peak amount of biomass observed in late May and early June. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the presence of the 45-, 70-, and 100-μm-wide forms was negatively correlated with temperature. Presence of the 130-μm-wide form was negatively correlated with irradiance. Isolates of these filament forms were exposed to temperature (15, 25, and 35° C)/irradiance (0, 60, 200, 400, 900, and 1500 μmol·m−2·s−1) combinations in the laboratory. Growth rates of the 45-μm-wide form were negative at all irradiances at 35° C, suggesting that this form is susceptible to high water temperatures. However, growth rates of the other forms did not vary at the different temperatures or at irradiances of 60 μmol·m−2·s−1 or above. Net photosynthesis was negative at 35° C and 1500 μmol·m−2·s−1 for the 100- and 130-μm-wide forms but positive for the 70-μm-wide form. All forms lost mat cohesiveness in the dark, and the 100- and 130-μm-wide forms lost mat cohesiveness under high irradiances and temperature. Thus, the morphological forms differed in their responses to irradiance and temperature. We hypothesize that the rapid disappearance of Spirogyra populations in the field is due to loss of mat cohesiveness under conditions of reduced net photosynthesis, for example, at no to low light for all forms or at high light and high temperatures for the 100- and 130-μm-wide forms. Low light conditions can occur in the interior of mats as they grow and thicken or under shade produced by other algae.

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