English, asked by geetagautam71080, 10 days ago

3. Imagine you recently attended a workshop on 'Stress Management in your
School. Write an e-mail to your friend telling him/her about its effectiveness.(Word Limit: 50 words)​

Answers

Answered by satyamkumar5428
0

Answer is 15625 . Hope it helps

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Answered by KANISHSHYAM
4

Answer:

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.There is a parable of a frog sitting in a pot on the stove. If dropped into a pot of boiling water, a frog would likely notice and try to escape.

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.There is a parable of a frog sitting in a pot on the stove. If dropped into a pot of boiling water, a frog would likely notice and try to escape.But when placed in a pot that is slowly approaching a boil, the frog doesn’t notice until the water has already reached an unbearable heat—at which point it is too hot for the frog to survive.

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.There is a parable of a frog sitting in a pot on the stove. If dropped into a pot of boiling water, a frog would likely notice and try to escape.But when placed in a pot that is slowly approaching a boil, the frog doesn’t notice until the water has already reached an unbearable heat—at which point it is too hot for the frog to survive.Have you ever experienced a slow acceptance of the pressures around you, until everything is “just too much” and you can barely cope?

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.There is a parable of a frog sitting in a pot on the stove. If dropped into a pot of boiling water, a frog would likely notice and try to escape.But when placed in a pot that is slowly approaching a boil, the frog doesn’t notice until the water has already reached an unbearable heat—at which point it is too hot for the frog to survive.Have you ever experienced a slow acceptance of the pressures around you, until everything is “just too much” and you can barely cope?If so, you’re not alone. About 8.3 million American adults were reported to have experienced serious psychological distress in 2017 (“More Americans suffering from stress, anxiety, and depression, study finds,” 2018).

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.There is a parable of a frog sitting in a pot on the stove. If dropped into a pot of boiling water, a frog would likely notice and try to escape.But when placed in a pot that is slowly approaching a boil, the frog doesn’t notice until the water has already reached an unbearable heat—at which point it is too hot for the frog to survive.Have you ever experienced a slow acceptance of the pressures around you, until everything is “just too much” and you can barely cope?If so, you’re not alone. About 8.3 million American adults were reported to have experienced serious psychological distress in 2017 (“More Americans suffering from stress, anxiety, and depression, study finds,” 2018).So what if we could notice the boiling signs earlier and even “turn down” the heat?

What happens when we continue “burning the candle at both ends” until we reach physical and emotional exhaustion?Just like the candle itself, we risk burning ourselves out.There is a parable of a frog sitting in a pot on the stove. If dropped into a pot of boiling water, a frog would likely notice and try to escape.But when placed in a pot that is slowly approaching a boil, the frog doesn’t notice until the water has already reached an unbearable heat—at which point it is too hot for the frog to survive.Have you ever experienced a slow acceptance of the pressures around you, until everything is “just too much” and you can barely cope?If so, you’re not alone. About 8.3 million American adults were reported to have experienced serious psychological distress in 2017 (“More Americans suffering from stress, anxiety, and depression, study finds,” 2018).So what if we could notice the boiling signs earlier and even “turn down” the heat?If stress “has become one of the most serious health issues of the 20th century and a worldwide epidemic,” then it is time to start growing our tools in handling stress

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